Magazine article The Futurist

Waterways to Connect Communities: A Program to Develop Rivers and Lakes Will Promote Local Stewardship and Tourism

Magazine article The Futurist

Waterways to Connect Communities: A Program to Develop Rivers and Lakes Will Promote Local Stewardship and Tourism

Article excerpt

A new National Water Trails System aims to increase community access to water-based outdoor recreation. At the same time, the restoration of local waterways will promote tourism and economic development through encouraging an ethic of stewardship, according to U.S. Interior Secretary Ken Salazar.

Like what the national trail systems have done for hikers, bikers, and other outdoor enthusiasts, national water trails would provide more recreational opportunities for water lovers such as kayakers, rafters, and anglers.

"Rivers, lakes, and other waterways are the lifeblood of our communities, connecting us to our environment, our culture, our economy, and our way of life," Salazar said in announcing the first national water trail, Georgia's Chattahoochee River. The river provides most of Atlanta's drinking water, and the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area provides more than 65% of the Atlanta metro area's public greenspace.

Designating waterways as part of the National Water Trail could be hindered by the costs associated with developing recreational facilities, notes Dan Foster, the National Park Service superintendent in charge of the Niobrara National Scenic River in Nebraska. He told the Lincoln Journal Star that a national water trail designation could benefit the local economy but also tax it "if people are not ready to take care of visitations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.