Magazine article Editor & Publisher

News Literacy in a New Democracy: Center for News Literacy Teaches Bhutan Citizens the Importance of Reliable Information

Magazine article Editor & Publisher

News Literacy in a New Democracy: Center for News Literacy Teaches Bhutan Citizens the Importance of Reliable Information

Article excerpt

Today's media landscape--replete with blogs, tweets, status updates, opinions, and gossip--has challenged consumers to wade through sources to determine which are credible.

Stony Brook University, located on Long Island in New York, established the first-ever Center for News Literacy in 2007. The curriculum has since spread to 31 college campuses and a dozen high schools in the U.S.

The school announced in April it had signed on to a three-year project in the Kingdom of Bhutan, a tiny Himalayan nation that implemented democracy in 2008. Since then, the country's media outlets have grown from one newspaper to 11 and from one radio station to seven.

"There was an explosion of media," said Stony Brook's dean of journalism Howard Schneider. "The citizens were not ready to separate the propaganda, which you need to have a functioning democracy."

Siok Sian Pek-Dorji, executive director of the Bhutan Center for Media and Democracy, attended Stony Brook's News Literacy Conference and expressed interest in working with Stony Brook to further news literacy in her home country.

"We wanted to know if our teaching could be exported overseas," Schneider said. "And we wanted to be able to teach the key principles of free-flowing information, how to apply standards, and show how (news literacy) can help their citizens make decisions. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.