Magazine article Talent Development

Gary Hamel: Business and Management Thinker and Consultant Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management London Business School

Magazine article Talent Development

Gary Hamel: Business and Management Thinker and Consultant Visiting Professor of Strategic and International Management London Business School

Article excerpt

Ranked by The Wall Street Journal as the world's most influential business thinker, Gary Hamel is a pioneer in 21st century business management, or "management 2.0." He is leading an effort to harness the power of open innovation and reinvent management through The Management Innovation Exchange, an online community through which the world's most progressive business leaders share their ideas about how to build organizations that are fit for the future and fit for human beings.

Hamel has written several landmark business books, including Competing for the Future, Leading the Revolution, and The Future of Management. His latest book, What Matters Now, was published in 2012. During the past two decades, he has authored many articles for the Harvard Business Review, The Wall Street Journal, Fortune, and The Financial Times.

Q WHAT ARE SEVERAL CHANGES YOU WOULD LIKE TO SEE OCCUR IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT IN THE 21ST CENTURY?

The real focus during the next decade or so needs to be on rethinking our management models: how we hire, promote, identify leaders, allocate resources, plan, and set direction. We're going to have to look for some new principles because the old ones that are very deeply baked into our organization--principles of standardization, specialization, formal hierarchy, unitary command, the use of extrinsic rewards, and so on--were good principles, but they're all in service of one overarching ideology, which is the ideology of control.

To supplement the ideology of control with the ideology of freedom is, for me, the primary challenge of the 21st century. We must understand the new organizational principles that we will need to embed in our companies if we want to have that sort of freedom and still retain a necessary control. And then we must experiment to rebalance our management models in ways that give equal weight to control, focus, and discipline; and then to creativity, experimentation, and innovation.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The challenges that companies face today--to change more rapidly than ever before, to be more adaptable, to meet the expectations of this next generation of employees who are not going to work in management, and to make use of new social technologies--are conspiring to launch us on what I expect to be another round of fundamental management innovation unlike anything we've seen since the Industrial Revolution. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.