Magazine article The Fader

From the Editor

Magazine article The Fader

From the Editor

Article excerpt

In eighth grade my English teacher assigned the class a research paper on a modern artist. He suggested subjects for us, and said I might like to write about German painter Max Ernst. His reasoning was that Ernst did a lot of drugs and made trippy art and that seemed like my thing. As a completely clean middle schooler, I took some general offense to this, but I understood his point: I like weirdo shit. I came to have an appreciation for Ernst and the Dada movement of which he was a part. Dada's principal tenet was an embrace of nonsense, spurred by a disregard for prude formalism and the regimented terror of WWI. This was the 192os European corollary for much of the American hardcore music I was becoming interested in. It was also the beginning of my interest in artists who were once detested and have since been canonized for trying to obliterate structure.

Since then I've often used Dada as a catchall term for music that does not embrace common forms. This is my favorite kind of music. If it sounds new, I'm curious. The internet age has had a huge effect on rap, with production progressing at a bewildering rate. Recording rap music at home is not much more difficult than using Skype, an ease of use that--along with ample digital distribution and a progressive attitude towards giving away music--has exploded the genre. Though it now sounds charmingly outdated, one of the first reasons Lil B bugged everyone out was his ADD-style 100 Myspace pages. He had no interest in or need for a singular touchpad when he could always make a new one. …

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