Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Price of Tidal Power

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Price of Tidal Power

Article excerpt

There's no joy in it but it's got to be done. We have to press ahead with harvesting the tidal energy of the River Severn, despite the havoc it is likely to wreak on local wildlife, because these days there is no such thing as local wildlife.

When we talk about living in a globalised world, we don't usually think about nations sharing wildlife. But we are now getting other people's fish. Bluefin tuna and anchovies are increasingly common in British waters and no doubt we'll be getting into fights with foreign fishing fleets about them soon. Elsewhere, species of Japanese coral are migrating northwards. A few weeks ago, Australian scientists issued a report into the ocean biodiversity in their region. Rather shockingly, their tropical fish are moving away--those that aren't dying off in the rapidly warming water are migrating southwards, following the plankton that are being carried on currents that are rising in strength.

You won't be surprised to hear that the blame for all this flux lies with global warming. Rising temperatures leave the inhabitants of the ocean no choice but to embrace change. Paradoxically, though, taking measures to combat global warming--such as building the Severn barrage to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels--will also force changes on the natural world. It's now a question of whether we value our creatures more than everyone else's.

The Severn provides Britain with a golden opportunity to exploit lunar power. The moon's pull causes earth's water to bulge out from the surface and the geometry of the Severn creates a bigger bulge than most. The difference between its high and low tide is the second largest in the world; only Canada's Bay of Fundy can beat the Severn's 14-metre pile of water.

Hold that heap of water back until just the right moment and the resulting torrent on release is a renewable source of energy. …

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