Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Masters of the Verse: The NS's Renewed Commitment to Poetry

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Masters of the Verse: The NS's Renewed Commitment to Poetry

Article excerpt

In an anthology of pieces from the New Statesman published in 1963, the editor Edward Hyams wrote that "the early work of almost every poet to make a name since 1913 appeared in the New Statesman. The literary editors, from J C Squire and Desmond MacCarthy to Karl Miller, have made a deliberate policy of seeking out young talent while never neglecting the old."

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

The editors' eye for talent was quite something in those early years. Poems were published by everyone from the war poet Siegfried Sassoon to W H Auden. Three weeks after his death in combat in 1917, the NS published Edward Thomas's "Adlestrop", which has become one of the most celebrated poems in English (today we publish poems by Thomas's biographer Matthew Hollis). W B Yeats's "Easter 1916" was first published in the NS in October 1920.

There have been excavations and discoveries, too. In 2010 we published, to immense international interest, "Last letter", a previously unseen poem by Ted Hughes that describes the events during the three days leading up to the suicide of his first wife, the poet Sylvia Plath. And there have been many curiosities over the years, as well--for instance, in 1959, we published Bertolt Brecht's "The Farmer's Concern", followed the next year, bafflingly, by a poem called "Midstream", written by Mao Zedong in the1920s. It includes the lines:

  O schoolmates, in youth blossoming and tall with talents,
  We must now in the arrogance of our knowledge
  Uproot our scented careers. … 
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.