Magazine article New African

Beyond Infrastructure: Uganda's Ministry of Works and Transport Has a Portfolio That Is Crucial to Many of the Country's Economic and Social Sectors. from Its Programme of Road Upgrades for the Capital, to Ensuring Tourists Can Move around Easily, Reliable Power Is Made Available and Agricultural Products Can Get to Market, the Ministry Is Tackling Its Many Challenges and Responsibilities with Vigour

Magazine article New African

Beyond Infrastructure: Uganda's Ministry of Works and Transport Has a Portfolio That Is Crucial to Many of the Country's Economic and Social Sectors. from Its Programme of Road Upgrades for the Capital, to Ensuring Tourists Can Move around Easily, Reliable Power Is Made Available and Agricultural Products Can Get to Market, the Ministry Is Tackling Its Many Challenges and Responsibilities with Vigour

Article excerpt

Uganda has made great strides in its infrastructural development over the last decade, especially in terms of the ICT sector, which has seen a major upgrading of the country's penetration levels and healthy competition between the mobile phone operators in the market, creating choice for consumers.

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This overhaul of infrastructure has not been confined to the ICT sector but also throughout roads, air and large-scale construction projects.

Uganda has also fared well with the Millennium Development Goals in terms of water and sanitation achievements throughout the country.

Moreover, the prospect of attracting investment in tourism needs to be complimented by quality road networks throughout the country to some of the main national parks and attractions. Queen Elizabeth National Park, the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest, and Murchison Falls National Park are all major tourist attractions in Uganda that could be made more profitable with the advent of improved accessibility.

Nor should it be forgotten that Uganda is East Africa's third largest economy, and a major coffee exporter in its own right. With reliable power and infrastructure, much more could be earned from value addition to its agroindustry.

Even as Uganda strives to be a top-50 crude oil producer, the country is now urgently having to find concrete solutions to power supply issues that have slowed economic growth. Hopefully, major projects such as the 700MW Karuma hydro station that the government has committed US$85.52m to develop will close the country's energy gap.

Consequently, as Uganda reaches 5o, there is a renewed sense of optimism and maturity in terms of what they believe can now be achieved. The capital city, Kampala, has embarked upon an ambitious five-year plan of regeneration, characterised by a campaign to make the city more sustainable, attractive and able to better deliver critical services to all residents.

This, of course, has not come without its own challenges. …

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