Magazine article The Christian Century

Lone Rangers

Magazine article The Christian Century

Lone Rangers

Article excerpt

The classic American "don't tread on me" attitude is exemplified by the flea market vendors studied by Arthur Farnsley II (see "Flea market capitalists," p. 22). They live off the economic grid and they like it that way. Like the dropouts of the 1960s, these Americans reject the institutions that most of us take for granted: not only big government and big business but also community organizations, schools and churches.

Unlike 1960s dropouts, however, these rebels don't intend to create a counterculture. Many are poor or come from working-class backgrounds. They mainly want, it seems, to be left alone, free from the confinements of modern life. They invoke themes from the American past, when people kept moving westward in search of elbow room. In many ways, they fit Alexis de Tocqueville's description of an American type in the 19th century: they "owe no man anything and hardly expect anything from anybody."

Perhaps each of these disaffected persons has a personal story to tell of being rejected, disappointed or wounded by the machinations of modern institutions and bureaucracies. For whatever reason, they don't expect much from social bonds, and they don't see a reason to give much back to society. …

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