Magazine article Art Monthly

Savorr X

Magazine article Art Monthly

Savorr X

Article excerpt

Samson & Hercules Norwich 11 to 15 January

January's Savorr, the tenth iteration of the Norwich-based artistled exhibition series, was formatted much the same as usual. Lucy Conochie was the featured artist, and works by Peter Bobby, Benjamin Doherty, Henry Driver, Benedict Hemmens, Henry Jackson Newcomb, Jack Killick, Luke McCreadie, Sarah McNulty, Simon Welfare and Oliver Williams bought the count of artists up to ten; about typical. However, the opening of the project's most recent show radiated a certain cohesiveness that has been missing previously. Undeniably, the standard of the selections is increasingly better, the accompanying text increasingly insightful, the use of the current venue's vast and many rooms increasingly sympathetic. Conochie presented a selection of seven works, constructed from glazed stoneware, linen and wood, among other things. The palette that Conochie uses in her work is both earthy and soft, with browns and pastels dominating. It is a pairing of colours that is equal parts soothing and current, and the simplicity and lack of precision with which her works are made is warmingly beguiling.

It seems Savorr's recently attained denary has earned it some attention, and now both a well-curated but also a refreshingly broad selection of artists are being drawn to the open-submission format every other month. The project's current crew - founder Newcomb, James Hassall, Hemmens, Sophie Victoria and Welfare - select all Savorr's exhibiting artists from the open call, except for each edition's featured artist. While these names are suspiciously frequent on the exhibited artists list themselves, this is symptomatic of self-organisation in an artschool city where creating a platform for showing one's own work is often the primary impetus for starting a project such as Savorr.

Despite some recurring names, works on show this time round were as diverse as always, with sculptures, paintings and videos all sharing the space. Savorr's current venue, Samson & Hercules, an otherwise unused former 'discotheque', as termed by Newcomb, is divided into ground-floor and basement galleries. The former has marginally more natural light but seems notably brighter due to its comparatively luxurious state of repair. The basement is a series of dark and dank rooms, well suited to the projections, monitors and more moody installations they house. Bobby's Curtain, 2012, fills one of the larger basement walls. The projection shows the interior of a lecture theatre at Newport's University of Wales, where Bobby is part of the faculty. Over the course of the 12-minute video the lecture theatre's wall-to-ceiling window is concealed and then revealed by an enormous red curtain. The camera's struggle to understand the change of light becomes explicit, the curtains starting as a black veil and, once fully closed, clumsily glitching into a bright, vibrant, 'Twin Peaksred', to quote Newcomb once more.

Works are not typically produced specifically for Savorr but there is undoubtedly a site-specificity inherent to an exhibition series that shifts venues so frequently. Oliver Williams's Untitled (Yellow), 2013, uses synthetic dry pigment to highlight a meeting of two walls from floor to ceiling. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.