Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Boss Isn't Kidding Anyone

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Boss Isn't Kidding Anyone

Article excerpt

If you're trying to become the leader of a political party or a chief executive, it might be a good idea to have some kids--especially if you're a man. For some reason, we like having family men at the top: perhaps because we think they're more relatable; perhaps because we think they're kinder or more empathetic.

Political leaders, in particular, often introduce policy measures that affect children with a brief mention of their own kids (just to show parents that they're on the same page)--or simply mention them apropos of nothing.

"My children have onesies and I often say I'm very jealous," Cameron announced this week, just to make sure, one last time, that we all know he's a dad.

The implication is that because a leader has children, he'll care more about children in general. Anecdotally, at least, this seems not to be true. Before having children, people tend to have a benign (if not particularly invested) attitude towards other people's kids. Have children of your own and these other kids become tiny competitors: less good at gym than your child but somehow in the gym team; inexplicably cast as Mary in the nativity play; undeservedly in a higher maths class; irritatingly better at the clarinet.

Although your image becomes fuzzier and warmer, your behaviour seems to go in the opposite direction. I have seen the genuinely empathetic suddenly start filling up their friends' Facebook newsfeeds with 12 daily pictures of their newborns (all, surely, the same picture). I have seen the genuinely interesting and funny suddenly unable to talk about anything but nappy rash. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.