Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Taking Sides: All Parties Love the Easy, Polarising Rhetoric of "Us" against "Them"-But How Distinct Are Their Ideas? in a New Weekly Series, Rafael Behr Explores the Dividing Lines of British Politics

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Taking Sides: All Parties Love the Easy, Polarising Rhetoric of "Us" against "Them"-But How Distinct Are Their Ideas? in a New Weekly Series, Rafael Behr Explores the Dividing Lines of British Politics

Article excerpt

There is a reliable way to tell if David Cameron is rattled. When the Prime Minister is on shaky ground, he hurls the charge of being "left-wing" at Ed Miliband as if it were the foulest thing he could say within the bounds of parliamentary protocol. The "Red Ed" label has never been a plausible line of attack but it is a comforting fiction for senior Conservatives who deride the Labour leader's agenda as a slide into unelectable socialism.

There isa matching obtuseness on the other side. Miliband accuses Cameron of Thatcherism and of "returning to the 1980s", forgetting that this is not an insult in Tory circles. The idea that Cameron is picking up the ideological crusade where the last Conservative government left off is central to Labour's image of the political landscape. Partly it is true, just as there is truth to the Tory view that Miliband hankers after more orthodox social-democratic politics.

The distinction between left and right in Britain looks starker now than at any time in the past 20 years. The polarisation inevitably follows the collapse of the economic consensus of the New Labour years. Tony Blair embraced Britain's role as a hub for ultra-liberal, globalised capitalism, which viewed intervention by the state in economic activity as reactionary in principle and ineffective in practice. Market forces and private business were deemed the likeliest mechanisms to improve public services. Labour's historic impulse to direct social change had to be managed by quiet redistribution around the margins. The Blair and Brown administrations intervened all over the place but lacked the will in Blair's case and the confidence in Gordon Brown's to assert the government's moral right to meddle. In opposition, the Tories argued against government policy but no Conservative leader substantially challenged the intellectual basis of the Blair-Brown model or offered a coherent alternative.

It is in the nature of a political consensus that those who are part of it define themselves as pragmatists and paint the dissenters as fanatics. Thus the New Labour position came to be defined as the "centre ground", with its critics occupying the fringe. The financial crisis has disrupted that geometry. The clear bankruptcy of the existing way of doing things created a demand for more distinctly ideological prescriptions. By the 2010 general election, the left was sick of tagging along with Blairish compromise; the right was brimming with radical intent pent up from 13 years in opposition.

Both sides felt vindicated. The left focused on the role of banks and global markets in the crisis and saw a definitive refutation of rampant market capitalism. The right focused on the Budget deficit and national debt and saw in them proof that Britain had been ruined by the unchecked expansion of government. Everyone thought that the political pendulum was swinging back in their direction.

Within that intellectual rivalry, there is a cruder impulse to settle old scores. Trade union leaders depict the Chancellor's austerity budgets as a cynical attack on the public sector with the strategic goal of dismantling the welfare state. Meanwhile, some ministers see resistance to the coalition's reforms as a return to left-wing militancy and proof that the unions are enemies of progress. The muted echo of batde cries from the early-1980s rings around Westminster.

The myth that politics can still be defined by competition between two mutually exclusive tribes, one red and one blue, suits Labour and the Tories. They want to cling to a parliamentary duopoly that, judging by voting patterns in the real world, has been in decline since the 19505. Before 2010, itwas the Liberal Democrats who were best placed to scoop up votes from those looking to register a protest with a "none-of-the-above" candidate. Nick Clegg forfeited that position when he went into coalition with the Tories--deliberately so, because he wanted the Lib Dems to graduate in the public's imagination to the status of a serious party of government. …

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