Magazine article Techniques

Use Your Voice to Change the Perception of CTE

Magazine article Techniques

Use Your Voice to Change the Perception of CTE

Article excerpt

AS YOU READ THROUGH THIS MONTH'S TECHNIQUES MAGAZINE, which is focused on at-risk youth, I know you will be thinking about the benefits that CTE provides students. Ensuring a quality education for all continues to be an important topic and an area of growing concern to national leaders because it is so closely linked with U.S. economic health and the standard of living for future generations.

And rightly so. One secondary school student drops out every 26 seconds in the United States, and many other students drop out of postsecondary education. Despite this fact, and the growing concern about the dropout issue, there continues to be a fundamental misunderstanding among many policymakers about effective ways to curb the problem.

The national conversation has focused almost solely on increasing the rigor of academics as a panacea, but the past 25 years of work in this arena have proven largely ineffective. While academie rigor is important, it means nothing to students if they are disengaged from learning and unable to apply the knowledge to a career which inspires them. That's where career and technical education (CTE) plays a significant and critical role. This is one of the strong messages we need you to bring to your elected officials in Washington.

In March, ACTE will be hosting the 2013 National Policy Seminar (NPS). It is an annual time when the CTE community gathers en masse to learn more about effective advocacy, hear from policy experts and promote a common message on Capitol Hill concerning the value of CTE. I encourage you to join us March4-6 to be part of this important annual event. …

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