Magazine article Information Management

A Roadmap for Effective Information Governance: An Effective Information Governance Program Is Based on a Corporate-Level Information Management Strategy. This Article Describes a 13-Step Process for Developing the Two Key Deliverables of This Strategy: A Strategic Information Management Plan and Roadmap

Magazine article Information Management

A Roadmap for Effective Information Governance: An Effective Information Governance Program Is Based on a Corporate-Level Information Management Strategy. This Article Describes a 13-Step Process for Developing the Two Key Deliverables of This Strategy: A Strategic Information Management Plan and Roadmap

Article excerpt

The records and information management (RIM) function is no longer sufficient to meet the demands placed on organizations by the current regulatory environment and by internal and external risk management expectations. A stronger accountability aspect needs to be added.

The emerging discipline of information governance--which is an accountability framework that includes the people, processes, policy, and technology that ensure the effective management of information to enable an organization to achieve its strategic goals and business programs--fulfills this role most effectively. This definition emphasizes IG as a strategic (accountable) function rather than as an operations function. It considers the input and effect of people (culture), business processes, policy, and information technology in ensuring the proper management of information and the proper balance between an organization's compliance requirements (part of its corporate strategy) and its business goals.

Principles for Developing SIM Roadmap, Plan

The final component of the IG definition is very significant, as it presupposes that the first step in developing an IG program is to develop an information management strategy that is consistent with business objectives and balances those objectives with compliance requirements.

Information management is an enterprise-centric function that includes the compliance focus of corporate-level classification, consistent metadata, retention, disposition, e-discovery processes, auditing, risk reduction, version control, security, access control, and any other management functions that assist the corporation in proving due diligence of its information management program.

The two key deliverables of an information management strategy are 1) a strategic information management (SIM) multi-year roadmap and 2) a SIM plan. Among other strategic tools, organizations use the Generally

Accepted Recordkeeping Principles[R] (the Principles) and its complementary Information Governance Maturity Model (Maturity Model) to develop their information management strategy. However, many organizations face the challenge of how to use them to develop the SIM roadmap and plan.

The SIM Plan Design Process

The 13-step SIM process flow chart shown in the photo illustration on page 27 can be used by an organization's SIM team to design its SIM plan, which then will be the foundation upon which the IG function operates.

Step 1--Develop a Company Overview

The first step in designing a SIM plan is to create an organization overview that will be used to assist in developing the Principles statements in Step 4. The overview consists of basic information about the organization, including such items as what industry it operates in, its strategic objectives, staff count, products offered, and geographical location.

Step 2-Review the Four SIM Dimensions

To ensure that the design team considers all aspects of SIM when developing the SIM roadmap and plan, it needs to have a clear understanding of the four SIM dimensions:

1. People (changes to the organization, cultural issues, incentives)

2. Legal (policies and penalties)

3. Business units (revisions to business processes to improve information flow)

4. Information technology (use of software and hardware)

Step 3--Complete an Infrastructure Questionnaire

Complete a questionnaire to identify and document the current status of the information technology infrastructure that supports the information management function (e.g., classification system, databases, indexing, information retrieval, auditing, e-discovery searches, and tech support).

Using the four SIM dimensions as a guide, look at resources, infrastructure, controls, and processes to understand what the starting point is for the SIM design. For example, the questionnaire should ask about:

* Organization and culture--Does the organization have a formal change management process? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.