Magazine article Geographical

Get Chartered

Magazine article Geographical

Get Chartered

Article excerpt

In recent years, the Society has seen a flourishing community of professionals formally recognised for using geographical skills in the workplace. Chartered Geographer (CGeog) accreditation has developed and grown since it was first introduced by the Society in 2002, with close to 500 geographers across a wide range of businesses and sectors gaining the qualification. These range from teachers, scientists. conservationists and environmental consultants to civil servants and military personnel, a demonstration of the strong employment prospects for geography graduates.

CGeog is the only internationally recognised professional accreditation for those with competence, experience and professionalism in the use of geographical knowledge, understanding and skills in the workplace. As such, it recognises the specific expertise that geography instils as a discipline, and the value of a geographical training. The accreditation provides recognition and a framework to support professional development, similar in concept and scope to that in other professions, such as Chartered Surveyor or Chartered Engineer.

For Clare Hadley, UK location and INSPIRE manager at the Ordnance Survey, becoming a CGeog in 2005 was a way of not only re-engaging with geography, but also developing professionally. Now an initial assessor for other applicants and a mentor, she believes that accreditation is becoming increasing beneficial for candidates.

'I applied to become a CGeog not long after it was first launched,' she says. 'I had a geography degree, and always felt I was a "geographer", but my career path had taken me down a slightly different, although related, path of land surveying and geo-information. Becoming a CGeog has certainly given me a greater understanding of some geographical issues that Ordnance Survey is seeking to solve by better use of geographical information.'

CGeog accreditation brings benefits for employers, too, as employees have an incentive to keep up their professional development and training. It also provides independent evidence of a highly skilled and qualified workforce. 'It opens doors for you--professionally, when you're looking for other jobs, but also with your own development,' says Zoe Briggs, GIS team leader at the Canal and River Trust. …

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