Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

A Duty of Care

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

A Duty of Care

Article excerpt

In "The Snow Queen", Hans Christian Andersen's fairy tale, a splinter from a magic mirror ends up in the eye of a boy, Kai. Made by a troll, this mirror distorts as it reflects, magnifying the bad and erasing the good.

Liz Jones sees the world through a similar filter. In her new autobiography, Girl Least Likely To, pitched as advice on how not to be a woman, she amplifies every small slight while every joy is diminished. She confesses: "Nothing was ever good enough for me."

Jones--fashion editor of the Daily Mail and mad monarch of confessional journalism--is well known for her self-loathing. And it's displayed here in abundance. She is "in doubt" about her "right to be alive". Her appearance turns her stomach. "I am unlovable," she declares, after her marriage collapses.

What is strange is how this is coupled with a clear self-regard. After all, what more powerful way is there to say one's life matters than to write an autobiography? And Jones is so self-obsessed that she always seems to put herself at the centre of everything. In an article for the Mail in 2011, she retraced the last steps of the murdered landscape architect Joanna Yeates, somehow making this young woman's death about herself.

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In the autobiography, this manifests itself largely in a belief that the whole world is in cahoots against her. When out dancing as a teenager, she is told that her grandfather has been knocked off his bicycle and killed. …

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