Magazine article Health Facilities Management

ASHE Offers New Course on Commissioning

Magazine article Health Facilities Management

ASHE Offers New Course on Commissioning

Article excerpt

Commissioning a ship involves getting it ready for active service. A commissioned ship has been tested, and its crew has been trained. Any equipment or operational problems have been fixed. It is ready to become part of a high-performing fleet. Likewise, the commissioning process for buildings ensures that a facility operates as it is designed to operate. This process helps organizations achieve the results they expect when building a new facility or making changes to an existing facility.

In both commissioning processes, there are upfront costs. But the Navy wouldn't dream of putting a ship into active service without fully ensuring its performance. And those involved with building health care facilities also should realize that commissioning can yield a significant return on investment. The cost of not commissioning a building can be far more expensive than up-front costs.

Still, making the business case for commissioning can be a challenge in today's economic climate. But a new educational program offered by ASHE explains how to advocate for the commissioning process and the value it brings to health care facilities.

The new course helps you to develop a business plan that will enable executive leaders to see the value commissioning brings and evaluate the return on investment. Case studies show how commissioning can help manage first costs, achieve the expected return on investment, meet the organization's strategic goals and provide sustained efficiencies. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.