Magazine article The Christian Century

Public School Yoga Classes Not Religious, Says Judge

Magazine article The Christian Century

Public School Yoga Classes Not Religious, Says Judge

Article excerpt

A California judge has ruled that the teaching of yoga in public schools does not establish a government interest in religion. The decision on July 1 came after parents sued the Encinitas Union School District to stop yoga classes introduced to elementary schoolchildren in the upscale suburb just north of San Diego.

San Diego Superior Court Judge John Meyer explained that although yoga is rooted in religion, it has a legitimate secular purpose in the district's physical education program. He also said the practice, contrary to parents' complaints, does not advance or inhibit religion.

Meyer said although he had some concerns about the K. P. Jois Foundation, an organization launched in 2011 that awarded the district a $533,720 grant to start the program, the district's yoga curriculum does not create any kind of excessive government entanglement with religion. That's because it is the schools--and not the foundation--that are ultimately responsible for supervising the yoga instructors, Meyer said.

The National Center for Law and Policy, a nonprofit based in Escondido, California, which represented the plaintiffs, said that it plans to appeal.

"We strongly disagree with the judge's opinion on the facts and the law," said Dean Broyles, who as president of the center represented Stephen and Jennifer Sedlock, whose child attends El Camino Creek Elementary School in Carlsbad, which is part of the Encinitas Union School District. …

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