Magazine article Anglican Journal

Imbalance in Western Media

Magazine article Anglican Journal

Imbalance in Western Media

Article excerpt

Women in developed regions enjoy wide access to higher education, yet for them, too, the media hold up a distorting mirror. A 2013 study by Washington-based Pew Research reported that in 40% of U.S. households with children, women are the primary breadwinners. But according to a study by the University of Southern California (USC), Annenberg, and the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in the Media, female characters "are still sidelined, stereotyped and sexualized in popular entertainment."

Fewer females than males work in prime-time shows and in family films. And on screen, females are often portrayed more as peripheral decorations than as committed professionals, showing more exposed skin and having unrealistic body characteristics.

Led by USC sociologist Stacy Smith, the researchers analyzed almost 12,000 speaking roles in prime-time TV programs, children's TV shows and family films. They also looked at female characters' occupations, clothing and body size. On prime-time television, 44% of females were gainfully employed, compared with 55% of males. As for speaking roles, only 28% of characters in family films, 31% of characters in children's shows and 39% on prime-time television were female. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.