Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Hezbollah's Next Move

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Hezbollah's Next Move

Article excerpt

The public debate over strikes on Syria has given Hezbollah and Iran ample time to ratchet up their rhetoric and threaten retaliation. The Iranian parliamentarian Mansur Haqiqatpur stated, "In case of a US military strike against Syria, the flames of outrage of the region's revolutionaries will point towards the Zionist regime." The Israeli prime minister, Binyamin Netanyahu, responded quickly and decisively: "The state of Israel is ready for any scenario. We are not part of the civil war in Syria but if we identify any attempt whatsoever to harm us, we will respond and we will respond in strength."

Hezbollah seeks to keep Bashar al-Assad in power for its own and Iran's interests. For years, Syria has been a reliable patron of the Islamist group, a relationship that only grew deeper under the rule of Assad. By 2010, Syria was not just allowing the shipment of Iranian arms to Hezbollah through the country but was reportedly providing the militant group with long-range Scud missiles from its arsenal.

Hezbollah is keen to make sure that air and land corridors remain open for the delivery of weapons, cash and other materials from Tehran. Until the Syrian civil war, Iranian aircraft would fly into Damascus International Airport, where their cargo would be loaded on to Syrian military trucks and escorted into Lebanon for delivery to Hezbollah. Now, Hezbollah is desperate either to secure the Assad regime, its control of the airport and the roads to Lebanon or, at the very least, to establish firm Alawite control of the coastal areas, so that it can receive shipments through the airport and seaport in Latakia, as it has done in the past.

To that end--and in case Iran, Hezbollah and Syria are unable to defeat the rebels and pacify the Sunni majority--it is establishing local proxies through which it can maintain influence in the country. …

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