Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Learning Genetic Risk for AD: Not So Distressing?

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Learning Genetic Risk for AD: Not So Distressing?

Article excerpt

AT AAIC 2013

BOSTON--Cognitively normal adults who learn that they are at high risk for developing Alzheimer's disease do not, as some clinicians fear, spiral downward into depression, anxiety, or distress, investigators reported at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2013.

An analysis of data from three randomized trials testing the effects of genetic testing disclosure found that that cognitively normal adults who learned that they were homozygous for the high-risk apolipoprotein E epsilon-4 allele (APOE epsilon-4) had a spike in test-specific distress score until about 6 months after learning the results but returned to levels similar to those of heterozygous carriers, reported Dr. Jason Karlawish, professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and his colleagues.

However, both homozygous and heterozygous APOE epsilon-4 carriers had more test-specific distress than did carriers of other APOE alleles, noted coauthor Leo B. Waterston of Harvard Medical School, Boston.

"While there is no question that learning that you're at higher risk causes some test-specific distress, this further validates that there is no long-term, sustained psychological distress," Dr. Karlawish said in an interview. People who learned that they were at high risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) were significantly more like to adopt putative AD risk-reducing behaviors, such as dietary changes, exercise, and medication or vitamin supplementation. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.