Magazine article Guitar Player

Rhythm Workshop: W.W.J.D.?-Part 5: Sliding Sixths

Magazine article Guitar Player

Rhythm Workshop: W.W.J.D.?-Part 5: Sliding Sixths

Article excerpt

ANOTHER SUITABLE-FOR-SLIDING interval that turns up in tons of Hendrix tunes (and many others) is the mighty sixth. These inverted thirds (major third = minor sixth; minor third = major sixth), which can be found lurking within almost any chord shape, have been used to create some pretty groovy rhythm guitar parts.

For instance, Ex. 1a reveals a pair of sixths, one major and one minor, nestled inside an "E"-shaped G chord barred at the 3rd fret, either of which will aptly portray a G chord sound. Likewise, Ex. 1b points out the resident sixths found within and around an open A chord. Like any interval, both sets are transposable to any key/ fret-position, and can be played either harmonically (both notes simultaneously) or melodically (one note at a time). Ex. 2a adds neighboring diatonic and chromatic sixths to the ones from Ex. 1a, while Ex. 2b does the same with Ex. 1b. Ex. 2c shows how bar 2 of Ex. la can be transposed (to A), broken up melodically, and ornamented with finger slides. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.