Magazine article The Exceptional Parent

Making the Transition from Parent to Coach: Yes, an Amateur Volunteer Coach Can Be Professional. in Word, Demeanor and Actions, Be the Type of Coach That You Would Want to Play for in Any Sport

Magazine article The Exceptional Parent

Making the Transition from Parent to Coach: Yes, an Amateur Volunteer Coach Can Be Professional. in Word, Demeanor and Actions, Be the Type of Coach That You Would Want to Play for in Any Sport

Article excerpt

You've done it! You volunteered to coach your child's team. No one else stepped up, so you opened your mouth and said, "I'll do it!" Now what? What do I do? Where do I start? What have I done? You ask yourself these questions as you venture down the road to coaching!

The first thing to consider is how your decision to coach will affect your own child. Many parents volunteer for the wrong reasons. They want to insure their child will play, or play a certain position. That is a recipe for disaster. If your intent is to make sure your child is the pitcher or quarterback, or plays on the front line in soccer, I humbly suggest that you retire immediately. Not only are you doing your child a disservice, but the potential for hard feelings abound with other parents and the kids on the team. Whether your child is deserving of the position or not has little to do with what you may hear during the season. When I coached my son in his high school basketball years, those issues surfaced once in awhile. Through his leadership, abilities and play, most of those criticisms were unfounded. But it didn't mean that those criticisms didn't hurt him or me. Some other things to consider as you begin your coaching assignment are:

BE ORGANIZED!

Many times, beginning coaches do not pay attention to the details in and around the sport and the time commitment involved. Stress starting on time and finishing on time. Long winded speeches accomplish very little. Keep it short and simple before, and definitely after games. The younger the age group, the shorter the speech. I have seen coaches at all levels talk way too long after a loss or even after a win. The kids need to get home on weekdays to do school work and be with family on week-ends. I learned early on that after a loss was the wrong time to go on and on. I used to say, "We need to work on our mistakes in practice tomorrow. We will talk about how we will get better tomorrow. Let's get a good night's sleep and get better tomorrow!" Trust me ... the kids and parents appreciated it.

BE POSITIVE!

I'd like to believe that this would be a given for anyone in coaching. However, it's not. Some beginning coaches make the mistake of coaching in the same manner they have been coached. Those methods may not work at all with today's modern athlete and parent. We have talked before about "sandwiching" criticism between two positive statements. "Timmy you're showing some good hustle out there today. Try to pass the ball a little more when surrounded by the defenders. I know you will make that adjustment in the second half." Another way is to remind the player that he or she is "the type of player who never makes the same mistake twice" or "the type of player who sets the example for the rest of the team." Just the other day, I heard Lou Holtz, ESPN football analyst and former Notre Dame football coach, say, "Praise in public ... and criticize in private." It is a good reminder for every coach to remember, whether they are a rookie or veteran.

BE EDUCATED!

The internet has made coaching ideas, drills, practice and game ideas available to everyone. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.