Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

For Men, Benefits of Smoking Cessation Persist into Old Age

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

For Men, Benefits of Smoking Cessation Persist into Old Age

Article excerpt

AT THE ANNUAL ESC CONGRESS 2013

AMSTERDAM -- Older men who continued to smoke in their 70s were 50% more likely to die from cancer, cardiovascular disease, and respiratory disease, compared with those who never smoked. They were also less likely to survive to age 85, according to findings from a British survey.

"The real message is that risk remains big for smokers at any age, and the evidence regarding benefits of quitting smoking persists even into old age," said Jonathan Emberson, Ph.D., a senior statistician at the University of Oxford (England), who presented the study at the annual congress of the European Society of Cardiology.

The results were from a prospective study of more than 7,000 surviving men who were initially recruited between 1967 and 1970 in the Whitehall study. The men were surveyed again in 1997-1998, when their mean age was 77 years. Follow-up information was obtained on cause-specific mortality through 2012.

At the resurvey in 1997-1998, 13% were current smokers and smoked a median of 9 cigarettes a day; 58% were former smokers, with median time of 25 years since quitting; and 23% said they never smoked. The remaining 5% said they were never-smokers in the resurvey, but not in the initial survey in 1967-1970, and were handled as a separate category the researchers noted.

During the median follow-up of 15 years, there were 4,965 deaths, 2,063 of which resulted from cardiovascular disease, 1,167 from cancer, 802 from respiratory disease, and 933 from other causes. …

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