Magazine article University Business

Study Questions SAT's Admissions Value

Magazine article University Business

Study Questions SAT's Admissions Value

Article excerpt

There is no significant difference in the success rates of students who submit standardized test scores to colleges and those who don't. That's the summary of a NACAC report, "Defining Promise: Optional Standardized Testing Policies in American College and University Admissions" (http://tiny.cc/nacac), which looked at nearly 123,000 students at 33 public and private institutions of all sizes. "The differences between submitters and non-submitters are five one-hundredths of a GPA point, and six-tenths of one percent in graduation rates," the report reads.

The report comes on the heels of word from College Board President and CEO David Coleman that a revised SAT is coming in spring 2016. Revisions include returning to a 1600-point scale from the current 2400, changing the kind of vocabulary words tested and making the essay portion (added in 2005) optional.

"The recent reinvention of the SAT, to me, was a competitive move in some ways," says journalist Anya Kamenetz, whose upcoming book, The Test (PublicAffairs, 2015) will cover the history and future of standardized testing. "SAT has lost ground to the ACT. The ACT has successfully marketed itself to school districts. …

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