Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Pseudobulbar Affect: More Common Than You'd Think

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Pseudobulbar Affect: More Common Than You'd Think

Article excerpt

AT THE AAGP ANNUAL MEETING

ORLANDO -- The prevalence of pseudobulbar affect symptoms--that is, uncontrollable, disruptive outbursts of crying and/or laughing--is considerably greater across a range of neurologic disorders than previously appreciated, according to the largest-ever study to screen for this condition.

Pseudobulbar affect (PBA) symptoms were found in the study to be more common among neurology patients under age 65; however, the adverse impact of PBA symptoms upon quality of life was greater in the elderly, Dr. David W. Crumpacker reported at the annual meeting of the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry.

He presented the results of the PRISM (PBA Registry Series) study, which enrolled 5,290 patients on the basis of having any of six neurologic disorders: Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, stroke, or traumatic brain injury. They were screened for the presence of PBA symptoms using the validated Center for Neurologic Study-Lability Scale (CNS-LS). A score of 13 or more was deemed positive, based upon its demonstrated good predictive value for physician diagnosis of PBA in patients with ALS, noted Dr. Crumpacker, a psychiatrist at Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas.

The overall prevalence of PBA symptoms among the 3,048 PRISM participants aged 65 years or older was 27.4%, with the highest rate seen in patients having ALS (see chart). In contrast, the prevalence of PBA symptoms among patients under age 65 years was 49.5%, with the highest rate--56.9% being seen in traumatic brain injury patients. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.