Magazine article CRM Magazine

Brands Deliver Inconsistent Engagements: The Phone Still Outperforms Other Channels for Customer Service

Magazine article CRM Magazine

Brands Deliver Inconsistent Engagements: The Phone Still Outperforms Other Channels for Customer Service

Article excerpt

Most companies are inconsistent in both the variety of their channel offerings and the quality of those channels when it comes to customer service, CX Act finds in its latest Customer Touchpoint Stress Test.

The research firm reported that the phone outperformed email, chat, and social media on issue resolution (according to 86 percent), but still left a great many consumers dissatisfied. Only 58 percent of consumers reported being satisfied with their phone interactions. Customer satisfaction with the other channels was far lower, with chat at 40 percent, email at 22 percent, and Facebook at 17 percent.

When it comes to resolution times, the phone took an average of16 minutes, email took 12.4 hours, Facebook averaged more than three hours, and chat averaged nine minutes for simple queries.

Half of companies offer email as a customer service channel, where it only yields resolution rates of 44 percent and satisfaction scores of 22 percent. Only one in four companies offer Facebook channels for customer inquiries, and issue resolution occurs only 27 percent of the time. Satisfaction scores for Facebook were the lowest, at 17 percent.

The study did not look at Twitter as a support channel, but "we can predict how it would fare based on how Facebook did," says Crystal Collier, CEO of CX Act.

Ease of use also continues to be a problem. Only 52 percent of survey participants said customer care information was easy to find on company Web sites, and when they did find it, only one in four (24 percent) found it extremely helpful.

"With more consumers turning to digital for customer service, especially... young consumers, brands need to take steps now to offer higher-quality service via digital," Collier says.

The larger problem is that companies are trying to do too much at once, according to the research. …

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