Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Aiming to Put NRPA out of Business

Magazine article Parks & Recreation

Aiming to Put NRPA out of Business

Article excerpt

Last year, NRPA launched an ambitious three-year strategic plan that was designed to accomplish something unheard of--to put NRPA out of business. That's right. If our strategic plan was to succeed as envisioned, and our mission to advance parks, recreation and conservation was fully achieved, everyone's quality of life would be vastly enhanced through parks and recreation. We would all be living in sustainable communities with complete access to the life-giving benefits of parks and recreation. Yep, there would simply be no further need for NRPA. We could close the doors and all go enjoy the benefits. Yeah, we wish.

The fact of the matter is it's not about the plan--it's about the people. NRPA's strategic plan may be a great plan as far as plans go, but it's about YOU and what you do in your daily life as a professional, as an advocate and as a leader to advance the mission of improving people's lives and activating the three pillars to their fullest expression in your community.

The goal of NRPA's strategic plan is to equip you with the tools and resources to make a difference. We know you can make an impact in implementing conservation practices throughout your community. We know you can measurably improve the health and wellness of individuals in your park and recreation programs and thereby improve the health of your entire community. And we know you can change the landscape when it comes to providing access for all, regardless of age, ability, background or income level, establishing social equity. We know this because we see examples of these revolutionary changes from agencies across the country every day, and we share those stories in Parks & Recreation Magazine, in social media and through all of NRPA's communications platforms. And while NRPA can and does provide resources such as research, education and programming while also advocating for favorable legislation, we ultimately rely on you to make the impact in the lives of those who you serve.

Since we all work to gain more funding for better parks, doesn't it make sense for all of us to agree on a unified approach and consistent messages to achieve this goal? Imagine our ability to make a difference if every one of NRPA's 40,000 members, who have a presence in virtually every community, agreed to focus their efforts on NRPA's pillars to help the public understand that parks and recreation is about the collective impact of solving problems, making communities more livable and improving the lives of all our citizens. …

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