Magazine article Management Today

Wise Words: Think Again - the Rise of the Spiritual Workaholic

Magazine article Management Today

Wise Words: Think Again - the Rise of the Spiritual Workaholic

Article excerpt

Do you remember the 1980s workaholics?

Superficially, these greedy yuppies looked a lot like the average employee of today: always busy and connected, networking non-stop and seeing everything as a work opportunity. But there was one fundamental difference: they were actually making money. In contrast, today's employees are generally unable to translate their workaholic habits into cash. However, there is an upside, which is that money has been downgraded - at least psychologically - in the world of work.

Of course, some people are more addicted to work than others, and this is usually the product of who they are. People with an addictive personality have less impulse control and a lower EQ, but are more neurotic, obsessive and given to sensation seeking. They often become addicted to work because it offers them a sense of control over other, less socially accepted habits. Thus work fulfils an important compensatory role for failures in other areas, such as relationships.

But today we no longer evaluate workaholics on the basis of their personality. Rather, the determinant factor is whether or not they love what they do. That - and not how much someone works or earns - differentiates the alienated workaholic from the engaged one. In fact, people who work hard to earn tons of money are as deplorable to the public as people who work hard to earn nothing, and they deserve no sympathy. They are, in fact, as vulgar and morally questionable as people who are lazy or unwilling to work. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.