Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Football Grub Is Armoured Fish and Giant Swiss Rolls

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Football Grub Is Armoured Fish and Giant Swiss Rolls

Article excerpt

It's hard to feel sorry for men paid 300,000 [pounds sterling] a week for prancing round a pitch, but even I pity the England football team, travelling 5,000 miles to eat scrambled eggs and pasta in a country that packs four continents into one cuisine.

Gone are the glory days of 1966, of Jimmy Greaves's match-day feasts of "roast beef and Yorkshire with all the trimmings, or pie and mash, followed by blackcurrant crumble and custard", or even the great Raich Carter's rather simpler take on the energy bar in the 1930s: six sugar lumps.

Football sounds like it was more fun in those days; indeed, most players once had great faith in the medicinal power of a pre-game whisky. But the England team's tournament boozing probably came to an end with Gordon Banks's ignominious exit from the 1970 Mexico World Cup, after drinking what he claims was a "spiked beer".

Instead, the ominously named current team chef, Tim De'Ath, has catered for a strict protein- and carb-heavy diet: rice, white meat, salad. I'd rather have had a place in the US squad, which scored the two-Michelin-starred chef Sergi Arola.

But the best spot of all has to be in the stands, eating beans sauteed in bacon fat and garnished with crackling and fried eggs, or great slabs of bolo de rolo, a huge Swiss roll filled with sweet guava jam--two of the local favourites on offer at stadiums in Brazil along with the usual hot dogs. Quite a step up from London 2012's greatest gastronomic achievement, the world's largest McDonald's.

And though few England footballers play abroad, if their shopping list from the 2010 South African cup is anything to go by they, too, have cosmopolitan tastes: 24 bottles of piri-piri sauce, 12 tubes of wasabi, 25 bags of pine nuts and 30 packets of custard.

I reckon once they'd got over the lack of Bird's, Rooney et al probably enjoyed a bit of Brazilian food. …

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