Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

More Teens Are Hospitalized for Eating Disorders

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

More Teens Are Hospitalized for Eating Disorders

Article excerpt

FROM PEDIATRICS

An increasing number of teens were hospitalized for restrictive eating despite not meeting the clinical definition for anorexia nervosa, according to a recent study.

Over 6 years, the proportion of patients admitted with a diagnosis of eating disorder not otherwise specified (EDNOS-Wt) increased from 8% (1 of 13) in 2005 to 47% (9 of 19) in 2009, compared with patients admitted with anorexia nervosa. Further, both groups showed similar clinical characteristics, Melissa Whitelaw of the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, and her colleagues reported (Pediatrics 2014;134:e758-64).

Among 174 patients admitted to the hospital's specialist eating disorder program, 99 were included in the study. Patients were excluded for a bulimia diagnosis, a previous eating disorder hospitalization, age under 12 years, no psychological symptoms, menstruation in the past 3 months, or logistical reasons.

Although the anorexia patients had lower admission weights and body mass index (BMI) measurements, the amount and duration of weight loss before admission did not significantly differ between the two groups. Anorexia patients had lost a median 12.7 kg, compared with 13.2 kg among EDNOS-Wt patients. Acute medical complications also were similar between the groups, except lowest lying systolic blood pressure, which was lower in anorexia patients, the investigators said. …

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