Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Perish the Thought

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

Perish the Thought

Article excerpt

Wittgenstein Jr

Lars Iyer

Melville House, 192pp, 12.99 [pounds sterling]

Lars Iyer's fourth novel carries an epigraph from Ludwig Wittgenstein, impelling thinkers to "descend into primeval chaos and feel at home there", but its core theme lies in the lament of its central character, a lecturer at Cambridge, that: "The philosopher's misfortune is to be a part of nothing. To stand apart from everything."

That standing apart is usually not through choice--this is an observation of a man torn down by external forces. "Wittgenstein Jr" is a nickname given to him by a group of students; his "aura" makes him an object of fascination, especially for the narrator, Peters, one of the few working-class northerners to attend Cambridge in an age when "raves are full of posh girls ... and the DJs have double-barrelled names" and undergraduates are expected to do no more than "fill the classrooms, and pay the fees".

His gang consists of 12 young men who veer between re-enacting Socrates's execution and drawing cocks on their notebooks, including Ede, the self-loathing Old Etonian who feels doomed to squander his family's heritage; tedious Titmuss, enlightened after his Indian gap year; Scroggins, who nearly dies after a ketamine overdose; and the athletic Kirwin twins, whose tragedy "is that there's no war for them to die in".

Besides the sad realisation that after graduating these people will never be together again or realise the potential that their teacher seems to see in them, there is deep melancholy beneath their fantasies about Wittgenstein Jr praising them or asking them to help him solve problems. As in Iyer's Spurious trilogy, about two philosophy lecturers called W and Lars Iyer, the humour derives from the gulf between the protagonists' world-changing ambitions and their awareness of their own impotence as anyone who does not fit in with the neoliberal vision of universities as sources of income is driven out.

Fighting indifference above all, Wittgenstein Jr is unashamed about reaching only a small audience, preferring to focus on those who might alter things rather than being led by numbers. As in Spurious, a crucial problem is that the ostensible comforts of 21st-century western society make the stakes feel so low. "You could say he's risked nothing more than paper cuts," reflects Peters, but Wittgenstein Jr wants thought to "tear out our throats" and his fulminations against "English lawn" dons who facilitate the monetisation of Cambridge provide the angriest, funniest monologues. …

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