Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

A Dishwasher in Antarctica

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

A Dishwasher in Antarctica

Article excerpt

Can you connect to the internet at the South Pole? It might not be the most obvious question to ask when planning a trip to one of the coldest, windiest and driest places on earth, but it has an unexpected answer: yes. We often assume that Antarctica is a lot like the moon or Mars dangerous, uninhabited and with no wifi. In the past decade the situation has changed.

Felicity Aston, who in 2012 became the first woman to ski solo across Antarctica, explains: "There's a gizmo which turns your satellite phone into a wifi hotspot, through which you can then connect a smartphone." Mundane as it sounds, it's transformative. Gone are the days of lugging heavy radio transmitters across the ice; and it isn't just a piece of kit, it's peace of mind. As Aston explains: "I've been able to tweet, I've been able to make podcasts, and it's also my lifeline. It's the way I can get help if something goes wrong." The bandwidth isn't sufficient to upload photos or video yet, but Aston predicts it won't be long: "I think that's more a case of them bunging up a new satellite in space than creating new technology."

Out there on the ice, hundreds of miles from any other human beings, her phone enables her to call anyone on earth. But that's a mixed blessing, as the tantalising prospect of a chat with your mum when you are utterly alone can play tricks with your mind: "It was too difficult to have those loved ones effectively in the tent with me one minute, and then press the disconnect button and send them back thousands and thousands of kilometres." The potential link it represented was psychologically important, though. "The whole time I was in my tent, I would have my satellite phone in my lap, even if I wasn't using it ... It became a symbol of the connection to the outside world, and I was literally clinging hold of it."

Yet technology isn't just a guarantee of safety or a means of alleviating loneliness. …

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