Magazine article ADWEEK

Driven to Fantasy: Hot Wheels Climbs in for Vanguard Pictures' Third Fast and Furious Stop-Motion Toy-Car Chase

Magazine article ADWEEK

Driven to Fantasy: Hot Wheels Climbs in for Vanguard Pictures' Third Fast and Furious Stop-Motion Toy-Car Chase

Article excerpt

Idea Vanguard Pictures won plenty of fans with its first two, unbranded Nitro Warriors films--exquisitely made stop-motion shorts showing toy cars in frenetic chases. Among them was Hot Wheels, which loved the way the films showed off its miniature vehicles. So, the Mattel brand officially got on board with the just-released third installment, Nitro Warriors: Dare to Connect, a wild three-minute film that follows two Hot Wheels cars careening on the brand's iconic orange tracks through fantastical alien landscapes. "When we saw their first Nitro films, we were elated to see a level of fandom that took Hot Wheels fun to a whole new level," said Lisa McKnight, svp, marketing, North America, Mattel. "We approached them for a partnership, knowing they were Hot Wheels fans themselves, bringing their imaginations to life in film."

Copywriting Vanguard's Paul Greer wrote and directed the new film, inspired by the brand's new online Track Builder game. "I drafted the original concept, showcasing the limitless possibilities of a boy's imagination through play," he said. "This served as the general vision and then translated into a storyboard. Every shot was outlined." The film opens with two Hot Wheels cars self-generating from mystical glowing balls guarded by a roaring dinosaur head (the epic imagery isn't exactly subtle) and zipping off for the world's craziest ride. They race through mountains and deserts; into and out of a raceway oval with three tiers of Hot Wheels cars watching; into the clouds, though a heavenly loop and back down to a high-rise building, rippling with electricity, where a winged gargoyle breathes out another mystical ball, which ends up being the finish line. There's no explicit Hot Wheels messaging beyond the logo, which appears at the beginning and end.

Filming/Art Direction Six months of production included two-and-a-half months of actual filming at a rate of one to three shots per day at a studio in London. (Each shot involves between 50 and 250 photographs. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.