Magazine article Marketing

Bite-Sized Business School: Organisational Behaviour & HR - the Flex Factor Helps Businesses Thrive

Magazine article Marketing

Bite-Sized Business School: Organisational Behaviour & HR - the Flex Factor Helps Businesses Thrive

Article excerpt

New management approaches to flexible working need to be put in place for businesses and employees to benefit, says Edward Truch.

Marketing is, by its nature, a flexible business, which, in turn, calls for flexible ways of working. Since July 2014 every employee has the statutory right to request flexible working after 26 weeks employment service. What many employers have not realised is that flexible working can bring substantial benefits to them as well as their employees. An RSA study ('The Flex Factor', 2013) revealed how employers who have embraced flexible working are benefiting in many different ways. Four of the main areas for marketing-related functions are:

- Improved service level for internal and external clients through new levels of work-team agility, which can better meet the challenges of fluctuating and often unpredictable workloads.

- Enhanced creativity by providing staff with more time to reflect on their projects and allowing more mental space for inspiration, such as the generation of ideas for marketing campaigns.

- Improved productivity through allowing staff to work in locations that better suit the nature of their work, for example copywriting in the quieter environment of home or a library, sometimes out of normal office hours.

- Meeting deadlines by working longer hours which can later be taken as time off.

In general, flexible working arrangements allow organisations to become more agile and able to respond effectively to the changing needs of their customers and the markets in which they operate.

They come in many flavours and normally involve granting greater autonomy to employees in terms of choosing where, when and how they work. However, the degree of autonomy needs to match the nature of the work. Many organisations opt for fixed core hours to ensure that activities involving teamwork and meetings continue as normal. …

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