Magazine article The Nation

Mixed Blood

Magazine article The Nation

Mixed Blood

Article excerpt

Mixed Blood is a film out of another school and time--Andy Warhol's Factory of twenty years ago, where a certain oddball realism was developed, taught and presented in such films as Chelsea Girls and Nude Restaurant. Paul Morrissey, the star (and only surviving) student, learned his lessons well and went on to make a series of remarkable movies of that era and its strange sensibility. Morrissey did for the East Village and West Hollywood in the early 1970s what Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini did for Italy after World War II: he let the depressing reality of lumpen life speak for itself.

Morrissey is at it again, and only a few blocks east of the old neighborhood where Holly Woodlawn, Joe Dallessandro and the gang from Trash gave nihilism such a bad name. The crew in Mixed Blood is a mixed bag of dope dealers, street toughs and casual assassins who run the rackets of Alphabet City, the restricted ghetto of shooting galleries, needle parks and vacant lots between Avenues A and D in lower Manhattan. Loisada, as it is more accurately called, lies upon the rapidly gentrifying quarters beyond its borders like an overactive adrenal gland on the kidneys of gentility. All the subtle relationships, the subdued violence, the sublimated greed, the sentimentalism, commercialism and racism of the metropolis are reflected in high relief in the ghetto. Like After Hours, Mixed Blood projects an urban nightmare, but with more splatter and less class.

Morrissey is more interested in scene than story, and the plot about a drug war in "the Alphabet" is both incomprehensible and irrelevant. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.