Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Early Psychosocial Factors Influence Adult CV Health

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Early Psychosocial Factors Influence Adult CV Health

Article excerpt

FROM CIRCULATION

Cardiovascular health in adulthood is directly related to favorable psychosocial factors in youth, according to the results of a study conducted using a new metrics system developed by the American Heart Association.

"Childhood and youth are important stages of life because cardiovascular diseases are rooted in early life and social determinants of health start to accumulate in childhood," wrote lead author Laura Pulkki-Raback, Ph.D., of Finland's University of Helsinki, and her associates (Circulation 2015 [doi:10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA. 113.007104]), adding that "release of the AHA 2020 Impact Goals makes it critical to examine all aspects, including psychosocial factors that may help in [their] attainment," which includes "expanded emphasis on prevention and greater understanding of the origins of cardiovascular disease."

Dr. Pulkki-Raback and her coinvestigators enrolled 477 males and 612 females aged 3-18 years from a nationwide randomized, cohort study, Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns. Subjects were measured for psychosocial factors - such as socioeconomic factors, emotional family environment, parental health behaviors, stressful events, self-regulatory behavior, and social adjustment - at baseline, and ideal cardiovascular health was measured in adulthood 27 years afterward. Participants were divided into cohorts based on age (young vs. old), and by age and sex. On average, subjects were aged 10 years at baseline and 37 years during the adult measurement phase.

According to the findings of Dr. Pulkki-Raback and associates, subjects' average score on the ideal cardiovascular health index in adulthood was 2.6. Total favorable psychosocial factors were found to directly associate with ideal cardiovascular health in adulthood: when adjusted for age, sex, and medication use; adding childhood cardiovascular risk factors. Multinomial regression analyses that show when favorable psychosocial factors rose by one point, the probability of having 2, 3, 4, 5, or at least 6 ideal cardiovascular health metrics rose by 6%, 14%, 17%, 17%, and 35%, compared with having 1 or fewer ideal cardiovascular health metrics, respectively. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.