Magazine article America in WWII

It's Always There

Magazine article America in WWII

It's Always There

Article excerpt

YOU JUST CAN'T GET AWAY FROM WORLD WAR II. There you are, sitting in the safety of your living room peeling green, red, and silver foil off holiday Hershey's Kisses and eating them as you watch one of the great soliloquies in history: "... And the angel said unto them, 'Fear not: for behold, I bring unto you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people. For unto you is born this day in the City of David a Savior, which is Christ the Lord....'" You can read the whole thing in the Book of Luke, but there's a surprising power in this animated boy named Linus, standing there clutching his blanket, reciting the passage alone in the spotlight.

At the next commercial interruption, you look to the coffee table for something to rescue you from some commercial where a bunch of neighbors dismiss the fantastically gaudy lights that decorate their houses to follow the other would-be beacons of Christmas spirit: the headlights of a brand-new, gift-wrapped Lexus. On the table you find this very issue of America in WWII, with the young sergeant dressed in khaki on the cover. The sergeant is, as the cover says, Charles Schulz, creator of Linus, Snoopy, and the rest of the Peanuts who star in the TV special A Charlie Brown Christmas. Known to have wielded a machine gun almost as ably as a pen and brush, Schulz fought in World War II. And that war shaped him and everything he created afterward.

If you turn on the radio after the special to sip a cup of hot chocolate while you listen to one of those radio stations that plays Christmas songs 24-7 through the season, you might hear "Happy Holiday," which also turns up in this issue. …

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