Magazine article Anglican Journal

An Evolving Relationship

Magazine article Anglican Journal

An Evolving Relationship

Article excerpt

IT'S ALMOST seven feet when it's rolled out full length! Connected by a dotted line through a ribbon of landscape from one end to the other are 72 entries by way of date and significant development that tell the story of "Indigenous Peoples and The Anglican Church of Canada." Half of the entries cover 140 years and the other half the last 20 years.

The first half begins with the 1452 decree by European leaders that "non-Christian nations have no right to their lands and sovereignty in the face of claims by Christian sovereigns." It tracks the implications of the Doctrine of Discovery, the federal government policy of assimilation through the Indian residential schools, and the 1920 decree making attendance in these schools compulsory for all Indigenous children. Twenty-five years later, the church's National Commission on Indian Work raised serious concerns about the living conditions in many of the schools and about the forbidding of the children to learn the history and culture of their own people. The 1969 Hendry Report called the church to a new course of action in its relations with Indigenous Peoples based on "solidarity, equality and mutual respect."

The second half begins with the 1993 apology by Archbishop Michael Peers. That entry is followed by 35 more, reflecting commitments to healing and reconciliation. The last entry is the 2014 establishing of the Primate's Commission to educate the church on the Doctrine of Discovery, considering the question,"What does reconciliation really mean? …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.