Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Eating Disorders Less Prevalent in Girls Who Eat with Family

Magazine article Nutrition Health Review

Eating Disorders Less Prevalent in Girls Who Eat with Family

Article excerpt

In one study, results after five years showed that adolescent girls who regularly ate meals with their family were found to be less likely to use diet pills, laxatives, and other extreme measures to control their weight.

In another study, it was explained that as youth progress from adolescence into adulthood, disordered eating behaviors, ranging from self-induced vomiting to binge-eating, become more common. According to that article, the authors emphasized the importance of identifying strategies for preventing disordered eating behaviors.

Dianne Neumark-Sztainer, Ph.D., M.P.H, R.D., and her team at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis studied 2,516 teenaged boys and girls at 31 different schools in the state. Each participant filled out two forms: one in class in 1999 and one mail-in survey in 2004. The group was asked about their body mass index (BMI) and relationships with their families when eating meals together.

The girls were reported to have taken less extreme measures to control their weight when they ate with their families throughout the study period. Boys who ate meals with their families did not reflect whether they would develop disordered eating five years later. …

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