Magazine article Guitar Player

Ibanez: JSM10 John Scofield Signature

Magazine article Guitar Player

Ibanez: JSM10 John Scofield Signature

Article excerpt

THIS MORE AFFORDABLE VERSION OF THE JAPANESE made JSM100 VT (which streets for around $2,800) is a sweet looking guitar that sports gold hardware, beautifully figured maple top and back with multi-layer binding, bound f-holes, and split-block fretboard inlays of abalone and mother-of-pearl. The ebony fretboard and black-faced peg-head are trimmed in ivoroid, and topping things off are a wooden trussrod cover bearing Scofield's signature and a nice fitting bone nut. The JSM10's medium-jumbo frets have a light polish and rounded tips, and combined with the wide-ish neck, the playing feel is excellent.

Despite being a little on the heavy side at 8.24 lbs, the JSMIO has a lively and resonant acoustic sound. Its intonation is tuneful in all reaches of the neck, and when played through a Fender Deluxe Reverb reissue (with handwired circuitry by George Alessandro) and a Mesa/Boogie Mark Five: 25, the JSMIO dished out sounds that were crisp and detailed with plenty of sustain afforded by the mahogany center block (upon which the bridge and tailpiece are mounted). One of the cool things with this guitar's otherwise standard electronics is a Tri-Sound switch that works only on the neck pickup to give you the option of running its coils in series, parallel, or split mode, which effectively turns it into a single-coil. Not available on the costlier JSM100 VT, the Tri-Sound setup greatly expands the range of sounds achievable from this guitar: fatter and louder in series, crisper with slightly less output in parallel (ideal for those times when a neck 'bucker is a little too wooly), and slimmer still in split, which happens to be a great option for clean rhythm playing when paired with the bridge humbucker. All of this really enhances the JSMlO's sonic flexibility, and thanks also to the nicely voiced Tone controls, which are useable throughout their entire rotation, you can dial in tones that rule for jazz, blues, funk, rock, and the list goes on. …

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