Magazine article Geographical

Moving Lives

Magazine article Geographical

Moving Lives

Article excerpt

A two-week trip to Isabela province in the northernmost part of the Philippines provided documentary photographer, Jacob Maentz, the opportunity to visually record one of the oldest and most nomadic tribes in the region

ABOVE: the Agta are a subgroup of the Aeta people, who are more commonly called Negritos in the Philippines. The Aeta are thought to be among the earliest inhabitants of the Philippines, preceding the Austronesian migrations. The Agta people mostly live in the mountains or forests, although they frequently migrate as they are still a semi-nomadic people. Because of their remoteness, it has meant that a lack of medical care results in only a third of all children reaching adulthood. The life expectancy at birth is just 16 years and for those that survive, this only rises to just over 27-years-old. However, conditions are improving as integration with larger communities increases, and many Agta--young and old--now attend school and find work as laborers in nearby towns such as Divilacan and Maconacon

LEFT: a young Agta man with his fish catch. It's not just the men who fish. Women--young and old--are adept at spearfishing, both in shallow streams and rougher, deeper waters. The women are also predominately in charge of trading in Agta communities, transporting meat, fish and goods to markets and conducting the trade deals themselves. This is partly due to the males' worries over their historical conflicts with Philippine lowlanders and the effects their presence could have on negotiations; TOP: Agta men chase small fish under larger rocks in the river, trapping them so they can be speared. Because spear-based techniques are the most common method used for catching fish, the activity generally takes place during the dry seasons when the rivers are low, warm and clear. Only when the conditions are less accommodating will the fishermen switch to line and net methods; ABOVE: two Agta men catching an octopus in the rocky shore where the creatures hide out. They use a metal spear to pierce the octopus and such is the size of the animal, it takes the two of them to pull it out of the rock

TOP LEFT: a grandfather and his grandson coming home in the rain from collecting fire wood on a nearby beach. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.