Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Association between OSA, Depression Confirmed

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Association between OSA, Depression Confirmed

Article excerpt

AT ATS 2015

DENVER -- Men with previously undiagnosed severe obstructive sleep apnea and excessive daytime sleepiness have a more than four fold increase in the risk of depression, compared with those without either condition, according to findings from a population-based cohort study.

Those with both severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) also have a 3.5 times greater risk of depression than do those with either OSA or EDS alone, Carol Lang, Ph.D., reported during a press briefing at an international conference of the American Thoracic Society.

The findings have important implications for clinicians treating patients with depression; clinicians should recognize the risk of OSA in men with depression, and should screen those presenting with OSA--regardless of whether sleepiness is present, said Dr. Lang of the University of Adelaide, Australia.

Study subjects were 1,875 community-dwelling Australian men aged 35-83 years who were assessed for depression using the Beck Depression Inventory/Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) at two time points about 5 years apart. A random sample of 857 men without previously diagnosed OSA underwent at-home polysomnography and completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale questionnaire, and 1,660 men without depression at baseline were included in the analysis of incident depression.

Previously undiagnosed mild to moderate and severe OSA were associated with depression prevalence (adjusted odds ratio, 2.1), and this was true even after adjusting for confounders and EDS.

EDS also was associated with depression (adjusted OR, 1.1). she said.

Patients with previously undiagnosed OSA and EDS had greater odds of depression than did those without OSA and EDS (OR, 4.2), and had greater odds of depression than did those with either condition alone (OR, 3.5).

Further, previously diagnosed OSA and previously undiagnosed severe OSA at follow-up were significantly associated with depression onset over a 5-year period (OR, 2. …

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