Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Secret History of Mardi Gras

Magazine article New Statesman (1996)

The Secret History of Mardi Gras

Article excerpt

There were only three of us in the Mardi Gras museum--me and two costume designers on tour with a circus from Brooklyn. I'd seen about as much of Mobile, Alabama, as I could stand in the midday heat: the cemetery full of yellow fever victims, the State Street Zion Church, set up by slaves ejected from mainstream Methodist services in the 1820s.

I wanted to know more about the purple beads that I'd seen slung in the trees in New Orleans years earlier, a full three months after Mardi Gras had ended: the residue of a wild week in which, as I understood it, fratboys joined outrageous queens and black jazz players in a binge of Green Hurricane cocktails. This deliciously debauched and liberal celebration of all human life apparently started here in Alabama--which struck me as strange, somehow. A tiny old lady led us into a large room where a carnival float the shape of a dragon stood against the wall. The parades are in January, she said, but really, the festival went on all year and there was a party that night.

Mardi Gras arrived with French settlers in 1703, but in Mobile they like to start the story with Michael Krafft, a one-eyed cotton broker who got drunk with friends on New Year's Eve in 1830 and raided Partridge Hardware Store, seizing hoes and forks and marauding through the streets to the mayor's house, where he was invited in for breakfast. Krafft formed the first society--or "mystic order" --to lead a parade around the city. Other cotton workers set up a rival group. Then more emerged, tied up with the city's businesses, with names like medieval guilds: the Knights of Revelry, the Maids of Mirth.

There are more than 40 mystic societies in Mobile today. The social and economic lives of powerful local families revolve around them, though their influence remains hard to assess because membership is secret--as with the Masons. …

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