Magazine article Gramophone

'Bach to Moog': 'A Realisation for Electronics and Orchestra' Brandenburg Concerto No 4

Magazine article Gramophone

'Bach to Moog': 'A Realisation for Electronics and Orchestra' Brandenburg Concerto No 4

Article excerpt

'Bach to Moog'

'A Realisation for Electronics and Orchestra' Brandenburg Concerto No 4, BWV1049. Cantatas: No 147--Jesus bliebet meine Freude; No 156--Sinfonia. Goldberg Canons, BWV1087. Goldberg Variations, BWV988--Aria. Orchestral Suite No 3, BWV1068--Air. Solo Violin Partita No 3, BWV1006 --Prelude. Toccata and Fugue, BWV565. Violin Sonata No 4, BWV1017--Siciliano (all arr Leon) Jennifer Pike vn Sinfonietta Cracovia / Craig Leon Moog synths Sony Classical (F) 88875 05261-2 (53' * DDD)

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Bach, performed on a modern copy of a period instrument: nothing new there. Until you discover the instrument in question is a recreation of the 1973 Moog System 55 modular synthesiser, lovingly handcrafted using, according to Moog's website, all of the original documentation and circuit board and art files.

In 1968 Moog exponent Wendy (then Walter) Carlos unleashed 'Switched-On Bach' on an unsuspecting public (4/69). In doing so, she altered the course of musical history--pop and classical--forever. 'Bach to Moog' is part celebration of Carlos's (in the eyes of some, dubious) achievement, part commemoration to mark 50 years since Robert Moog first introduced his large-format analogue modular synthesisers and 10 years since his death. …

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