Magazine article USA TODAY

Northern Europeans: Don't Farm on Me

Magazine article USA TODAY

Northern Europeans: Don't Farm on Me

Article excerpt

Northern Europeans in the Neolithic period initially rejected the practice of farming, which otherwise was spreading throughout the continent, a team of researchers has found. These findings offer a new wrinkle in the history of a major economic revolution that moved civilizations away from foraging and hunting as a means for survival.

"This discovery goes beyond farming," explains Solange Rigaud, the study's lead author and a researcher at the Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences, New York. "It also reveals two different cultural trajectories that took place in Europe thousands of years ago, with southern and central regions advancing in many ways and northern regions maintaining their traditions."

It long has been established that the first farmers came to Europe 8,000 years ago, beginning in Greece and marking the start of a major economic revolution on the continent: the move from foraging to farming over the next 3,000 years. However, the pathways of the spread of farming during this period are less clear.

To explore this process, the researchers examined more than 200 bead types found at more than 400 European sites over a 3,000-year period. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.