Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Commentary: Is Extreme Racism a Mental Illness?

Magazine article Clinical Psychiatry News

Commentary: Is Extreme Racism a Mental Illness?

Article excerpt

The ungodly massacre of nine black worshippers at a church in Charleston, S.C., reignites the question: Is extreme racism a mental illness? The prime murder suspect, a young white man, allegedly hated black people and hoped to incite a race war. Media outlets categorized the alleged perpetrator as deranged, demented, and delusional. Nevertheless, mental health professionals are reluctant to classify racial terrorists as mentally ill.

The American Psychiatric Association contests extreme racism (as opposed to ordinary prejudice) as a mental health problem. The psychodynamics of extreme racism were all but ignored until the 1960s. After multiple racist killings in the civil rights era, a group of black psychiatrists sought to have extreme bigotry--not ordinary bigotry--defined as a mental disorder.

The association's officials rebuffed the recommendation, arguing that so many Americans are racist that even extreme racism is normative and better thought of as a social aberration than an indication of individual psychopathology.

Some felt that a mental illness diagnosis would serve as an excuse and absolve perpetrators of personal responsibility for their gruesome acts. Others believed a psychiatric diagnosis would open doors to an insanity defense plea that might lead to exoneration. However, such fears do not hinder diagnosing mental disorders in other capital murder defendants. Raising these extraneous issues evades the point.

Similar questions have arisen with regard to genocide. Whether individual Nazis exterminating Jews were insane or merely acting out the extremes of a pathologic society is an ongoing debate. Describing these killers as evil falls far short of a psychological evaluation. Reports document that Hitler suffered from diagnosable paranoia. Were his followers ill as well? There is a point at which the cultural norms with regard to racism clearly separate from extreme racism, a manifestation of serious individual psychopathology. Societal racism facilitates incorporating bigotry into a person's racist psychotic and antisocial dysfunction. Many murderous paranoid schizophrenics have had racial targets at the core of their psychotic delusions. The criminal justice system (perhaps a step ahead of psychiatry) now refers to such violence as hate crimes--but that tells us little about the offender's psychological state. …

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