Magazine article Dance Magazine

Celebrating Five Dance Luminaries: National Ballet of Canada's Karen Kain, Noche Flamenca's Soledad Barrio, Dance Historian David Vaughan, Urban Bush Women's Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and American Ballet Theatre's Marcelo Gomes

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Celebrating Five Dance Luminaries: National Ballet of Canada's Karen Kain, Noche Flamenca's Soledad Barrio, Dance Historian David Vaughan, Urban Bush Women's Jawole Willa Jo Zollar and American Ballet Theatre's Marcelo Gomes

Article excerpt

Karen Kain

Anyone who saw Karen Kain running down a flight of stairs as the 16-year-old Princess Aurora in The Sleeping Beauty will never forget the thrilling impact of her youthful exuberance. Those were the 1970s, when the National Ballet of Canada, frequently headlined by Rudolf Nureyev, regularly danced at New York's Metropolitan Opera House and crisscrossed North America on lengthy tours. Nureyev recognized Kain's stellar talent early on, and, as her frequent partner in guest engagements, he made sure the world knew, too. She was soon a sought-after artist. But, despite her foreign engagements, she remained loyal to NBoC, and danced with the company for 28 years. Her retirement was celebrated with a special cross-Canada Karen Kain Farewell Tour.

Yet her greatest role might be the one she performs today: NBoC's artistic director. When she took the job in 2005, she set herself three major goals--to raise the level of classical dancing, diversify the repertoire and get the company touring internationally again. Ten years in, NBoC is now dancing better than ever. The repertoire has added works by Aszure Barton, William Forsythe, Wayne McGregor, John Neumeier, Crystal Pite, Jerome Robbins and Christopher Wheeldon, whose Alice 's Adventures in Wonderland and The Winter's Tale NBoC co-produced with The Royal Ballet. In 2011, the company unveiled a new staging of Romeo and Juliet by Alexei Ratmansky. Most importantly, Kain has championed new work by Canadian choreographers, presenting all-Canadian triple bills and recently commissioning a full-length version of Le Petit Prince from principal dancer Guillaume Cote.

The combination of excellent dancing and a revitalized repertoire has helped achieve her third goal, to return NBoC to the world stage with visits to Los Angeles, London, New York City and Washington, DC. "Touring has become difficult and expensive," she says. "I can't replicate the experience I had 40 years ago, but I'm determined to pursue what's possible. We'd been almost totally left out for too long. Now, we're part of the conversation in the ballet world again."--Michael Crabb

Soledad Barrio

The greatest flamenco artists are said to possess "duende," a Spanish word loosely translated as an inner spirit that emanates from an intense emotional connection with song and dance, and that produces a trancelike state in observers. Or, as Goethe defined it, "a mysterious power that all may feel and no philosophy can explain."

Soledad Barrio delivers the essence of duende. Through her many performances with Noche Flamenca, founded by Barrio and her husband, Martin Santangelo, she has committed her life to the primal elegance and passion of flamenco. With her snaking arms, sinuously flowing walks, rhythmically complex footwork, intentioned gaze and climactic, fiery eruptions, Barrio is one of the greatest flamenco performers in the world.

Born in Madrid, Barrio danced as soon as she could walk, although she didn't begin formal flamenco studies until she was 18. Gypsy tradition wasn't in her lineage, but it certainly inhabited her soul. "Since I was very young, dance has given my life a reason to exist," she says. "I was lucky enough to encounter flamenco." Her mother's family survived Franco's often brutal dictatorship, an experience that helped shape Barrio's earthy authenticity as a performer.

Barrio studied with such distinguished flamenco artists as Maria Magdalena, El Ciro, El Guito and Manolete. Before forming Noche Flamenca, she danced as a soloist with the companies of Manuela Vargas, Blanca del Rey, Luisillo, El Guito, Manolete, Cristobal Reyes, El Toleo and Ballet Espanol de Paco Romero.

Although she is a master of the full spectrum of flamenco styles, she is particularly known for the solea, the flamenco form that expresses the deep anguish of a rebellious cry. (The word fittingly derives from soledad, defined as "loneliness" or "solitude"). …

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