Magazine article Dance Magazine

Wheeldon. Ratmansky. McGregor. Scarlett. Peck. Are Ballet Companies All Starting to Look the Same?

Magazine article Dance Magazine

Wheeldon. Ratmansky. McGregor. Scarlett. Peck. Are Ballet Companies All Starting to Look the Same?

Article excerpt

They're everywhere.

This season, Royal Ballet artistic associate Christopher Wheeldon will premiere a new work for The Royal in February as part of a Wheeldon triple bill, before the company reprises his much-acclaimed The Winter's Tale (which was also performed in November by the National Ballet of Canada). And in addition to a new ballet for New York City Ballet and a new Nutcracker for the Joffrey Ballet in December 2016, Wheeldon's signed on for stagings of his previous works for seven other international troupes.

Justin Peck will choreograph two works for NYCB, a new ballet for San Francisco Ballet and stage his Year of the Rabbit for Miami City Ballet, Pacific Northwest Ballet and Dutch National Ballet. Similarly, Wayne McGregor's and Liam Scarlett's premieres and previous works will be danced from Paris to Houston to San Francisco. And it's no surprise that Alexei Ratmansky will continue his global ubiquity, especially in the narrative-ballet department.

All five men are wonderfully accomplished choreographers. Wheeldon and Peck instinctively shape ensembles with master craftsmanship and musicality. Scarlett and McGregor display a deft contemporary edge that appeals to young audiences. And Ratmansky brings heart and soul to the stage. Why wouldn't any company jump at the chance to work with this millennium's best?

While some may decry the death of ballet, this burst of creative output and shared goodwill has others heralding a new golden age, a cornucopia of choreographic plenty. But are companies oversaturating the market with these named choreographers, and making ballet too safe?

Truthfully, hot-property choreographers have always existed. William Forsythe, Jiri Kylian, Twyla Tharp, Benjamin Millepied and Nacho Duato have all had their Warholian 15 minutes--or longer. But this gang is different. All are resident or affiliated artists with ties to major traditional big-budget companies: The Royal, NYCB and American Ballet Theatre. Their prestige is both institutionally sanctioned and marketed by corporate teams. The widespread presence of these pedigreed men reflects the merchandising of ballet that can happen in a nanosecond.

The way companies now cyber-network allows them to easily communicate and share information, as well as to determine which choreographic offerings they like via a YouTube clip. And the licensing and dissemination of ballets has emerged with impressive sophistication.

Naturally, with globalization, there are some significant positives. High-quality choreography can be imported almost anywhere. Dancers get to stretch their technical and stylistic chops working with world-class artists. Companies can share productions, particularly expensive full-length ballets, making the process more cost-efficient.

With the pressure to sell out theaters, ballet companies turn to respected names, similar to the way Broadway shows now bank on star actors to guarantee a box-office bonanza. The troubling erosion of ballet audiences can be mitigated by marketing a sexy, young choreographic prodigy. And the companies, choreographers and dancers tweet, Instagram and Facebook their experiences.

Of course, with all this inevitably comes "branding": a word that makes some salivate and others groan. A choreographer these days is often a traded commodity, and, as it seems, part of a programming formula, in which a good season starts with a modernized classic by Ratmansky and ends with a wild work by McGregor. Franchising is here, in what Mark Morris has accurately called "the ballet industry." Will this monopolization of choreography make the biggest, richest companies the Apples and Amazons of the ballet industry?

And in the act of franchising, what is lost? For one, companies need an original voice to claim artistic distinction. In the previous century, you could absolutely discern the Joffrey Ballet or ABT from NYCB or The Royal Ballet in terms of style and repertoire. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.