Magazine article Landscape & Irrigation

This Year's Legislative Challenges Will Continue to the Next

Magazine article Landscape & Irrigation

This Year's Legislative Challenges Will Continue to the Next

Article excerpt

2015 was a busy year in landscape government affairs issues at the federal level, with departments and agencies proposing new and restrictive regulations. It almost appears that they were told to open up the flood gates with regulations they wanted to be implemented, and were told to not worry if the regulation was adequately researched or had a full economic evaluation.

Also used on some regulations was the Interim Final Rule (IFR) procedure, which avoids a large amount of comments and fast tracks them. This procedure is used when an agency finds that it has good cause to issue a final rule without first publishing a proposed rule, it often characterizes the rule as an "interim final rule," or "interim rule." This type of rule becomes effective immediately upon publication. In most cases, the agency stipulates that it will alter the interim rule if warranted by public comments. If the agency decides not to make changes to the interim rule, it generally will publish a brief final rule in the Federal Register confirming that decision.

More regulated industries experienced fewer new firm births and slower employment growth between 1998 and 2011. This relationship is most evident in small firms rather than large firms.

President Obama's administration pace of regulations has exceeded President Bush's, despite having once said that he has approved fewer regulations in his first term than his Republican predecessor. When they were analyzed, they were also more costly.

The President doesn't say things like that anymore. Instead, at this phase of his presidency, he promises to act without Congress wherever possible.

America's regulatory process was designed nearly 70 years ago; we are now confronted with a growing number of massive, costly, and complex rules. These growing regulatory burdens and the uncertainty caused by badly written regulations are a fundamental problem. We feel that federal regulations should be narrowly tailored, supported by strong and credible data and evidence, and impose the least burden possible while still implementing Congressional intent. Not so with this current administration. Another detriment to many regulations is a new report found more regulated industries experienced fewer new firm births and slower employment growth between 1998 and 2011. This relationship is most evident in small firms rather than large firms.

Examples of these kinds of regulations are the Department of Labor's H-2B new IFR and overtime pay rule with 290,000 comments, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U. …

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