Magazine article Artforum International

"Time Flies like an Arrow, Fruit Flies like a Banana": Cultural Foundation of Tinos

Magazine article Artforum International

"Time Flies like an Arrow, Fruit Flies like a Banana": Cultural Foundation of Tinos

Article excerpt

"Time Flies Like an Arrow, Fruit Flies Like a Banana"

CULTURAL FOUNDATION OF TINOS

Curated by Valentinas Klimasauskas, "Time Flies Like an Arrow, Fruit Flies Like a Banana" was the culmination of the Tinos Quarry Platform, a new residency program cofounded by artist Petros Touloudis and Vasilis Nasis. Time on this Cycladic island is marked by diurnal rituals that vary according to seasonal harvests, in contrast to the relentless treadmill of urban life. Assembled in a museum conference room, the installations, produced through encounters between international artists and local artisans, conjured a lively, and strangely harmonious, conversation between starkly different conceptions of time and being, captured perfectly in the syntactic ambiguity of the title.

For The Contingency of Cheese (all works 2015), Jennifer Teets worked with local farmers to cultivate goat cheese, a process that triggered discussions about island economics and animal behavior. Suspended in locally handcrafted baskets lined with pantyhose, the aromatic balls embodied the essence of reciprocal transformation growing out of the collaboration as they continued to age, harden, and grow mold formations. Lorenzo Cirrincione's Sunless Hours is an abandoned schoolhouse cabinet full of lesson books, archived and transported to the conference room; its mantle of dust, the distilled residue of time, filled a transparent tube fashioned into a belt, a sort of chronology. Wresting it from the shadow of oblivion, the artist altered the artifact's existential trajectory, effectively rearranging its temporal cellular structure.

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Known since antiquity for its marble production, Tinos is home to an active artistic community and a school focusing on sculptural techniques. Dorota Gawgda's Ophidians--marble carved with snake-eye motifs in the shape of the decorative fanlights adorning island doors--stared penetratingly from atop a stack of modern red chairs. Mikko Kuorinki instructed a potter, a pair of weavers, and a marble carver to produce objects within certain parameters, resulting in unexpected expressions of colliding visions: An anthropomorphic terra-cotta pot was positioned precariously on top of an audiovisual cart--an embroidered cloth and marble sculpture propped on the shelves below--its mouth agape as if lecturing to the room's battalion of empty chairs. …

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